The Center for the Performing Arts in Rhinebeck

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Come join our family for some great entertainment.

 


For immediate release: February 2, 2016

Contact: Lou Trapani

(845) 876-3088 ext. 14

trapani@centerforperformingarts.org

 RHINEBECK For those who are familiar with The CENTER for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck, it is no surprise that yesterday one could walk out of the Sam Scripps Theatre, happily humming the tunes of Meredith Wilson’s classic musical The Music Man while watching the crew begin the deconstruct phase. It was the closing performance and the world still seemed so perky, so pastel, so perfectly River City, Iowa. Harold Hill had just conned his way into the town and the hearts of all who live there – and, more importantly, the hearts of all who got the chance to witness this classic. 

And thus continues the work at The CENTER and this year, an all-important election year, our season is based on the theme of Americana: plays about the American experience, written by Americans, and performed in a distinctive American environment.

Kaufman and Hart’s hilarious depression-era comedy, You Can’t Take It With You, debuts in February and recounts the lives of the Sycamores, a truly American tribe who struggle with poverty and uncertainty and who do so with wisdom and grace.

Eve Ensler’s latest installment in her canon of plays decrying violence against women, A Memory, a Monologue, a Rant, and a Prayer will play the last weekend in February and will be part of a world-wide initiative to “take back the night” for women who are victims of abuse.

A Pulitzer Prize-winning drama about our not-so distant history and the rise of AIDS will move audiences in Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, scheduled for March; and musical theatre will never seem more alive as the Sharks and the Jets battle for territory in Leonard Bernstein’s West Side Story, playing in April.

A weekend of new works by Hudson Valley playwrights will take place in early May and the American pop music scene, and its impact on our nation’s culture, will be showcased later in the month with Rock of Ages. A Louisiana beauty shop comes to life as the women who inhabit it make us laugh and cry in Robert Harling’s moving Steel Magnolias, playing in June.

In July and August, two riveting musicals, Assassins and Chicago, examine crime in our country: one kind of crime targeting the highest executive in the land and the other treating crime as a result of love won and love lost.

In September, the preppie vs. town satiric classic, Heathers, graces the stage, followed by a new musical drama centered in a small town in Delaware County, Safe.

In October and November, two true American classics, Inherit the Wind and Born Yesterday will be featured. The former is one of the most renowned courtroom dramas in American theatrical literature and examines the concept of intellectual freedom in a traditional world. The latter is a biting comedy, also examining intellectual freedom as it is newly born, and set amidst the corruption in our nation’s capital.

And finally, in December, a silly but essential musical, Elf, treats the American family, abandonment, and the saving grace of Christmas. A perfect play to end our American year.

An examination of American society – its social backdrop, its character studies, its political insights – is what makes 20th century American theatre so profound and readily distinct from much of competing world literature. With new musicals, classics, searing dramas, and family-friendly options, your choices at The CENTER this year are many and varied.

So enter the familiar, sometimes profane, yet mostly sacred world of American theatre. You will be delighted and will remember what it is that identifies our country and its people.

Performances for most shows are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 pm but please always check our website for details.  Tickets can be ordered on line, 24 hours a day, by visiting our website: www.centerforperformingarts.org or by calling our box office at (845) 876-3080. In-person box office hours are Noon to 5 pm, Tuesday through Friday, and 1pm to 5pm on Saturday.

The CENTER, a non-profit arts and education institute, is located at 661 Route 308, three and a half miles east of the center of the Village of Rhinebeck.

 

The Media is cordially invited to preview and review any production.


  • 661 Route 308
    Rhinebeck, NY 12572
  • 845-876-3080

http://www.centerforperformingarts.org/

 

The Center for the Performing Arts in Rhinebeck
  • 661 Route 308
    Rhinebeck, NY 12572
  • 845-876-3080

Today many adults and children of all ages call The CENTER their second home and enjoy performances, workshops and special events in our cozy setting. Come join our family for some great entertainment.

See you at The CENTER!  

For immediate release: February 2, 2016

Contact: Lou Trapani

(845) 876-3088 ext. 14

trapani@centerforperformingarts.org

 RHINEBECK For those who are familiar with The CENTER for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck, it is no surprise that yesterday one could walk out of the Sam Scripps Theatre, happily humming the tunes of Meredith Wilson’s classic musical The Music Man while watching the crew begin the deconstruct phase. It was the closing performance and the world still seemed so perky, so pastel, so perfectly River City, Iowa. Harold Hill had just conned his way into the town and the hearts of all who live there – and, more importantly, the hearts of all who got the chance to witness this classic. 

And thus continues the work at The CENTER and this year, an all-important election year, our season is based on the theme of Americana: plays about the American experience, written by Americans, and performed in a distinctive American environment.

Kaufman and Hart’s hilarious depression-era comedy, You Can’t Take It With You, debuts in February and recounts the lives of the Sycamores, a truly American tribe who struggle with poverty and uncertainty and who do so with wisdom and grace.

Eve Ensler’s latest installment in her canon of plays decrying violence against women, A Memory, a Monologue, a Rant, and a Prayer will play the last weekend in February and will be part of a world-wide initiative to “take back the night” for women who are victims of abuse.

A Pulitzer Prize-winning drama about our not-so distant history and the rise of AIDS will move audiences in Tony Kushner’s Angels in America, scheduled for March; and musical theatre will never seem more alive as the Sharks and the Jets battle for territory in Leonard Bernstein’s West Side Story, playing in April.

A weekend of new works by Hudson Valley playwrights will take place in early May and the American pop music scene, and its impact on our nation’s culture, will be showcased later in the month with Rock of Ages. A Louisiana beauty shop comes to life as the women who inhabit it make us laugh and cry in Robert Harling’s moving Steel Magnolias, playing in June.

In July and August, two riveting musicals, Assassins and Chicago, examine crime in our country: one kind of crime targeting the highest executive in the land and the other treating crime as a result of love won and love lost.

In September, the preppie vs. town satiric classic, Heathers, graces the stage, followed by a new musical drama centered in a small town in Delaware County, Safe.

In October and November, two true American classics, Inherit the Wind and Born Yesterday will be featured. The former is one of the most renowned courtroom dramas in American theatrical literature and examines the concept of intellectual freedom in a traditional world. The latter is a biting comedy, also examining intellectual freedom as it is newly born, and set amidst the corruption in our nation’s capital.

And finally, in December, a silly but essential musical, Elf, treats the American family, abandonment, and the saving grace of Christmas. A perfect play to end our American year.

An examination of American society – its social backdrop, its character studies, its political insights – is what makes 20th century American theatre so profound and readily distinct from much of competing world literature. With new musicals, classics, searing dramas, and family-friendly options, your choices at The CENTER this year are many and varied.

So enter the familiar, sometimes profane, yet mostly sacred world of American theatre. You will be delighted and will remember what it is that identifies our country and its people.

Performances for most shows are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 pm but please always check our website for details.  Tickets can be ordered on line, 24 hours a day, by visiting our website: www.centerforperformingarts.org or by calling our box office at (845) 876-3080. In-person box office hours are Noon to 5 pm, Tuesday through Friday, and 1pm to 5pm on Saturday.

The CENTER, a non-profit arts and education institute, is located at 661 Route 308, three and a half miles east of the center of the Village of Rhinebeck.

 

The Media is cordially invited to preview and review any production.

 

 

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